Jung Platform

Carl Jung

Who is Carl Jung and what is Jungian psychology?

 

Carl JungCarl Jung is widely recognized as one of the greatest thinkers of the last century and is one the founding fathers of psychoanalyses and dream work. His psychology emphasizes the value of one’s creative forces and one’s development toward wholeness.
Jung’s contributions include: A theory of the structure and dynamics of the psyche, personal unconscious and collective unconscious; Dream work; A theory of personality types (introvert/extrovert); The process of psychological development or “individuation,” which has terms that have become part of our language as complexes and archetypes.
Jung transformed psychotherapy from a practice concerned with treatment of the sick into a means for higher development of the personality. That means the illness often has a purpose, so depression is no longer only a disorder or a sickness, but there is a purpose and meaning to it.

 

How can Jungian psychology help you?

 

Jung provides a perspective and method for personal development. It will help you connect with the inner guiding center. This center somehow already knows who you are and what you need to become and will help you achieve that. A connection with your center will result in better relationships with others, your partner, peers, colleagues, and yourself. It will help you develop your specific destiny, which is tremendously satisfying.

 

The life and works of Carl Jung

 

The Swiss psychiatrist Carl Gustav Jung founded analytic psychology at the turn of the last century. This discipline emphasizes the value of one’s creative forces and one’s development toward wholeness.
Jung’s contributions include: a theory of the structure and dynamics of the psyche, both conscious and unconscious, and of the way the unconscious manifests itself in dreams; a theory of personality types which has gained broad acceptance; a thorough study of the purposive nature of individual psychological development, as articulated in his concept of the “individuation” process; and a description of the universal images (archetypes) deriving from the deepest layers of the psyche, the collective unconscious.
This concept of the collective unconscious gives analytical psychology its unique dimension of meaning in comparison with other traditions of psychotherapy. It moves the practice of psychotherapy from a focus on psychopathology and its symptoms to a consideration of the meaning and purpose of these symptoms when understood symbolically, by placing them in the larger context of the evolution of the human psyche in all its imaginative and cultural manifestations.
In his effort to understand and engage the whole person, Jung viewed his analytical psychology as a therapy which releases creativity and promotes individual psychological development. Thus, far from being just another theory, Jungian psychology embraces the universe in all its manifestations: art, history, myth, philosophy, and spirituality are all essential components of Jung’s worldview.
Jung transformed psychotherapy from a practice concerned with treatment of the sick into a means for higher development of the personality. That means the illness often has a purpose, so depression is no longer a disorder, a sickness, but there is a purpose and meaning to it.